Lincolnshire

£3.7m boost for adult social care in Lincolnshire

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Lincolnshire County Council has revealed how it will be using £3.7 million from the government to boost existing care services and allow new projects to further help those in need of care and support.

The funding, given by the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, aims to enable adult social care services to ease the pressures faced by hospitals during the winter months, and will include a care worker bursary aimed at recruiting 240 new home care workers.

A total of 33 complaints were made regarding adult social care services provided by Lincolnshire County Council to the Local Government and Social Care Ombudsman last year, including a report of a woman who was moved to a dementia ward for ten months, despite not suffering from the disease, whilst waiting home care provisions to be arranged.

Within the report, the ombudsman made recommendations to the council to improve after the authority conceded there may be other individuals in similar circumstances.

Lincolnshire County Council.

Councillor Mrs Patricia Bradwell OBE, executive member for adult care and community wellbeing at the council, said:  “The way we’re using this additional temporary funding is to increase support to Lincolnshire residents over the winter period.

“Winter can be a challenging time for delivering services, more people need support when they’re discharged from hospital, and social care needs to be there to continue their care.

“It is also important that people will see a joined up approach between the council and all health partners, so this winter they will get the right services to support them.”

The funding, £3.7 million each year for the next two years, will be looking to ensure an quicker transition for patients from hospital to home, as well as additional beds for those with complex needs leave hospital.

Winter can be a challenging time for delivering services, more people need support when they’re discharged from hospital, and social care needs to be there to continue their care.

Investment will also be given to support nursing homes, fund new technology for e-consultations to allow people to stay in their homes for longer and a falls response service pilot.

Glen Garrod, executive director for adult care and community wellbeing at Lincolnshire County Council, said: “We are committed to work with all our partners in the county to ensure people get the best possible care and support for them and their families in cold weather.

“As a council we have a long track record of innovation and in working closely with our colleagues in the NHS and increasingly with all the district councils. Integrating services where appropriate can help expand the choices available and continue to provide the best possible outcomes for the people of Lincolnshire.”