North Lincolnshire

Health trust cuts contract with ‘human body parts pileup’ company

Northern Lincolnshire and Goole NHS Trust has terminated its contract with a disposal company after it was found to have stockpiled human body parts and dangerous waste.

Healthcare Environmental Services (HES) was found to have a backlog which included amputated limbs, infectious liquids and cytotoxic waste linked to cancer treatment at some of its UK sites.

As reported by the Health Service Journal, the Environment Agency said that the firm had breached its permits due to the stockpiling.

A criminal investigation was launched into the company which blamed the backlog on a lack of high-temperature incinerators.

Diana, Princess of Wales Hospital in Grimsby. Photo: Lincolnshire Reporter

Now, a spokesperson for NLaG has confirmed that the trust has cancelled its contract with HES and moved to another supplier.

The trust added: “There has been no disruption to our work and our services continue to operate as normal.”

A contract has been negotiated by the Cabinet Office, Department of Health and NHS Improvement for Mitie to step in and provide the contract.

NLaG, which runs Scunthorpe and Grimsby Hospitals, was one of many health authorities which relied on the company for its waste disposal.

Minister for Health, Stephen Barclay MP.

Health Minister, Stephen Barclay MP, confirmed today that around 15 of the 50 NHS trusts affected by the stockpiling have also terminated their contracts with the firm.

In a statement to Parliament, Mr Barclay said NHS Improvement concluded that HES “failed to demonstrate that they were operating within their contractual limits.

“Consequently, 15 NHS Trusts served termination notices to HES formally to terminate their contracts at 4pm on Sunday,” he said.

New arrangements have been made with Mitie to “step in and replace this service” and “NHS services continue to operate as normal”, Barclay told MPs.

He said: “On July 31, the Environment Agency notified central government of an issue concerning clinical waste collection and disposal for hospitals and other public services provided by the company, Healthcare Environmental Services.

“In this instance, the primary concern was that too much waste was being held in a number of waste storage and treatment sites by a contractor, Healthcare Environment Services.

“While the waste was stored securely, it was not being processed and disposed of within the correct regulatory timescales.

“At no point has there been an impact on public health or any delay to the ability of the NHS to carry out operations.”


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