Boston

Lincolnshire GPs and nurses missed live maggots living under patient’s skin

A Lincolnshire NHS trust has said that it has brought in improvements in patient care after a woman was discovered to have live maggots living under her skin.

GPs and nurses in the county both failed to spot that Ruth Milne had this horrifying condition, with Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust offering its deepest sympathy to her family.

Ruth, 83, was admitted to Boston Pilgrim Hospital on June 9, 2015, with severe sepsis.

Skin tissue in both her legs was infectious, with the live maggots inside.

She died within 24 hours of admission, on June 10.

An inquest overseen by Paul Cooper, senior coroner for south Lincolnshire, concluded in May 2017 that Ruth died of natural causes.

However, a number of concerns were raised about the continuity of care she was given and how live maggots seen under her skin by hospital staff on the day of her admission were somehow missed previously.

Strong unpleasant odours were also noticed by family members and medical staff from as early as January 2015.

The investigation, which was published online in August 2017, identified that “continuity of patient care by various nurses attending and the lack of expertise in the weeks immediately preceding her death did not assist”.

Lisa Stalley Green, director of nursing and operations at Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust, said: “Following the death of Mrs Milne in June 2015, our safeguarding team carried out an internal investigation as one of the organisations involved in delivering her care.

“This resulted in recommendations relating to improved case management, team development and ongoing management of long term conditions.

“These recommendations have since been implemented and I would like to reassure that any opportunity to improve is welcomed and made a priority within the trust.

“We offer our deepest sympathy to Mrs Milne’s family.”